Syrian garbage

Refuse crisis

The Syrian refugee crisis is paradoxically helping Lebanon solve its longstanding trash disposal problem. The refugees are themselves producing more garbage, and since Lebanon has long struggled with the problem of where to put much of its refuse, the European Union was prompted to donate €14 million ($18 million) in 2014 to build more landfills

They deserve better

The root of good

The international community’s response to the Syrian crisis is growing even more shameful with the passage of time. Since Syria’s war began in 2011, governments in the developed world have very obviously put political and military considerations before humanitarian concerns. Not surprisingly, the consequences have been disastrous for millions of Syrians — both refugees and

Q&A iraqi refugees

Transit and turmoil

Executive sat down with Elyas Salameh to discuss his documentary “Transit” and the situation of Iraqi Christian refugees in Lebanon.   With “Transit,” what were you asking yourself that convinced you to make the documentary? I focused on Iraqi Christians because [they] still have their own identity and if they flee Iraq it will disappear.

Children make up half the Syrian refugee population in Lebanon

The new lens

“The Interior Ministry is going to build camps, even if they are not approved by all.” Nouhad Machnouk, interior minister and member of the Future Movement, September 27, 2014. “The cabinet … is against setting up camps. Imagine if we had 500 Ain el-Hilweh camps.” Elias Bou Saab, education minister and member of the Free

syrian resto2

Beyond Barbar

On the corner facing Barbar’s large and always busy outlet on Hamra’s Piccadilly Street is Beit Halab, an unassuming, modestly sized venue which opened three months ago. Like Barbar, it has a variety of meats on display, ready to be grilled for sandwiches. Unlike Barbar, which is almost always packed, there is only a trickle

iraqi refugees4

Refugee purgatory

Elyas Salameh needed extras. Back in 2010, while on set shooting a TV commercial in Beirut, Salameh needed people to fill one of the scenes being filmed that day. There was one small hiccup with the extras he found — a language barrier. They were Aramaic speakers — Assyrian Christians from Iraq. “Lebanon is a

diving

Jumping in with the big dipper

Middle Eastern and North African equities plunged between October 10 and 16 in a regional dip that was big, widespread and not caused by anything local or even a real change of economic conditions elsewhere. With double digit falls in Dubai, Riyadh and Cairo, plus drops of more than five percent in Muscat, Doha and

State institutions must play a more effective role in the oil and gas sector (BeirutParliament | Wikipedia | CC BY-SA 2.5)

Beyond EITI

This article is part of Executive’s special report on the oil and gas sector. Read more stories as they’re published here, or pick up October’s issue at newsstands in Lebanon.   A paradox confronts countries endowed with oil and gas resources. Despite their riches, these countries tend to grow slower in the long term, have

jarre-arak Brun

Raise your glass

Arak is in a bad state. Although it was the drink of choice for many Lebanese up until the Civil War, tough competition from whiskey and other spirits has driven it from all but a few traditional settings. And don’t even mention trying to penetrate the youth market. Indeed, as the eyes of both the

In flavor of Arak

In flavor of arak

This article is part of an Executive special report on beer, wine and arak. Read more stories as they’re published here, or pick up October’s issue at newsstands in Lebanon. No Lebanese mezze table is complete without a pitcher of milky white arak and its accompanying little glasses. This anise infused drink made from distilled grapes,

Regie

Boom times at the Régie

This article is part of an Executive special report on industry. Read more stories as they’re published here, or pick up October’s issue at newsstands in Lebanon. The cedar tree may be the national symbol, but when it comes to smoking the national cigarette brand Cedars, it is the Syrians that have the strongest affinity. In

Beer

Multiple shades of amber

This article is part of an Executive special report on beer, wine and arak. Read more stories as they’re published here, or pick up October’s issue at newsstands in Lebanon. To many Lebanese, Almaza has been synonymous with beer. Ask for a beer at a bar or restaurant, and it was a chilled bottle of Almaza

Domaine de Baal

When size doesn’t matter

This article is part of an Executive special report on beer, wine and arak. Read more stories as they’re published here, or pick up October’s issue at newsstands in Lebanon. Lebanon produces about 9 million bottles of wine annually, almost half of which are produced by two wineries alone — Château Ksara and Château Kefraya. The

Domaine de Baal

It’s all in the grape

This article is part of an Executive special report on beer, wine and arak. Read more stories as they’re published here, or pick up October’s issue at newsstands in Lebanon. September was a busy month for Lebanon. From the Bekaa Valley to the hills of Batroun, from the mountains of the Chouf to Jezzine in the

Rising spirits

Rising spirits

This article is part of an Executive special report on beer, wine and arak. Read more stories as they’re published here, or pick up October’s issue at newsstands in Lebanon. There is general doom and gloom in the economy in Lebanon, consumer confidence is down and polls indicate general pessimism about the future. But one sector

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