Naameh dump receives most of Beirut and Mount Lebanon's waste |Greg Demarque|

Cleaning up

If all goes as planned, 2015 will be a big year for new contracts in the waste management sector, which has been dominated by the Averda companies Sukleen and Sukomi since the 1990s. The government is pushing ahead with a national municipal solid waste (MSW) plan that will see the country divided into six service

Greg Demarque | Executive

Prognosis growth

Perhaps the first thing refugees fleeing a war zone need is medical attention. It is no surprise, then, that Lebanese hospitals have been busier than usual since war engulfed Syria in 2012. According to a recent UNDP study, in fact, in 2014, humanitarian aid inflows focused on Syrian refugees have spurred 1.76 percent in additional

Greg Demarque | Executive

All grown up

Some are starting to see it. As the world moves to the web and mobile, leaders of industry are beginning to see changes happening from their vantage points at the top of the chain of command. They also see threats to their positions. The term ‘burning platform’ refers to the idea that traditional industries can’t

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Misplaced blame

For many Lebanese, from government ministers to taxi drivers, the cause of the country’s economic downturn is clear: 1.16 million Syrian refugees. While a population increase of more than 25 percent has certainly strained infrastructure and further challenged the state’s ability to provide basic services, the notion that the refugees are directly responsible for sluggish

Joseph Kaï | Executive

Second class citizens — or worse

The subjugation of women — often unwitnessed, overlooked or otherwise ignored — is today’s greatest challenge facing equality among the genders in the Middle East, says Kenneth Roth, executive director of Human Rights Watch (HRW). In Beirut, presenting the organization’s annual global report on human rights practices, Roth spoke with Executive about women’s rights in

Lebanon is failing miserably to ensure fair treatment of women

(Un)happily ever after

All couples hope their marriages will work out and they will live happily ever after. But the truth is that many relationships end in divorce and Lebanese couples are no exception. According to a 2012 study by the Lebanese Central Administration of Statistics, there were almost 6,000 divorces in 2010. The issue for these couples

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Lamia Moubayed: At society’s service

For this month’s special report on women in the workforce, Executive chose to profile a selection of seven successful, upper managerial level, Lebanese working women. Read more profiles as they’re published here, or pick up March’s issue at newsstands in Lebanon. Lamia Moubayed, head of the Institut des Finances Basil Fuleihan (IoF), believes that there

Greg Demarque| Executive

Christine Sfeir: Quite the balancing act

For this month’s special report on women in the workforce, Executive chose to profile a selection of seven successful, upper managerial level, Lebanese working women. Read more profiles as they’re published here, or pick up March’s issue at newsstands in Lebanon. “My mother is very important to me. She raised four children while working when most

Greg Demarque| Executive

Hayat Nader: Making it count

For this month’s special report on women in the workforce, Executive chose to profile a selection of seven successful, upper managerial level, Lebanese working women. Read more profiles as they’re published here, or pick up March’s issue at newsstands in Lebanon. “I’m very comfortable with numbers and I love to work with them,” says Hayat Nader,

Greg Demarque| Executive

Rana Salhab: Breaking the glass ceiling

For this month’s special report on women in the workforce, Executive chose to profile a selection of seven successful, upper managerial level, Lebanese working women. Read more profiles as they’re published here, or pick up March’s issue at newsstands in Lebanon. “When I travel for work, people ask me how I have the heart to leave

Lining up the paperwork could make all the difference (Greg Demarque | Executive)

A refugee on paper

The unprecedented rate at which the number of Syrian refugees in the region has grown has caught the world’s attention. After nearly four years of unrest, roughly 1.17 million Syrians are currently registered as refugees in Lebanon — and the number continues to creep up. But an often underreported and misunderstood figure is the number

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Serving peace of mind

When Lebanon’s health ministry last year embarked on a proactive national food safety campaign, it disrupted industries that by all indications had been complacent for far too long. Inspections of establishments in all parts of the citizens’ food supply chain revealed practices ranging from bad to repulsive to outright criminal — such as unsafe storage

Greg Demarque| Executive

Laure Sleiman: A news worthy woman

For this month’s special report on women in the workforce, Executive chose to profile a selection of seven successful, upper managerial level, Lebanese working women. Read more profiles as they’re published here, or pick up March’s issue at newsstands in Lebanon. When Laure Sleiman was first appointed as director of the National News Agency (NNA) in

Greg Demarque | Executive

Nesreen Ghaddar: All alone at the top

For this month’s special report on women in the workforce, Executive chose to profile a selection of seven successful, upper managerial level, Lebanese working women. Read more profiles as they’re published here, or pick up March’s issue at newsstands in Lebanon. For most of her academic life, from her years as a student to teaching as a

Greg Demarque | Executive

Mona Abdul Latif: A real life superhero

For this month’s special report on women in the workforce, Executive chose to profile a selection of seven successful, upper managerial level, Lebanese working women. Some of these women work in the private sector, others are in the public sector, but for all the differences in their job titles and roles, they share some commonalities.

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