Author Archives: Faysal Badran

Beware of stockbrokers bearing gifts

In November 2003, EXECUTIVE predicted that the revival in stocks would prove ephemeral (‘Happy Days?’, November 2003), stressing that technical and even fundamental factors would prevent a genuine new bull market from developing out of the ruins of the old. Furthermore, the dizzying move up from October 2002 appeared to be mostly a corrective move

Lebanese bonds: stable but vulnerable

As the world markets, mature and emerging, went through the turbulent transition from low rates by the Federal Reserve to “a measured and consistent rise,” most bond markets suffered. In fact all bond markets suffered. The reverberations of each pronouncement by Federal Reserves chieftain, Alan Greenspan, are felt all over, in commodities, equities, but most

Take a hike

Crude oil and its derivatives epitomize the notion that besides matching bids and offers, there often lies in the background a multitude of factors, which not only affect prices but also, and more importantly, the perception about supply, capacity, consumption and relative tightness/availability of the product. The movements in crude oil have been, to a

Safe from harm?

Is Lebanon a genuine emerging economy? If so, how has the country been able to escape unscathed through the domino-like collapse of new entrants into the global financial architecture. After the implosion of several Asian “tiger” economies and the more recent Russian debt crisis, it seemed that the Lebanese bubble would burst. The common reflections

Spike in the Euro

Back in January 2002, we analyzed the fate of the euro in this section, looking at its performance since its launch and placing the technical framework for what appeared to be a move up, destined to hit the $1.17-$1.20 area. As is often the case in the currency markets, the euro has not only overshot

Yet another bad year

It has become customary, in the first few weeks of January, to lay out forecasts for the rest of the year. Analysts from the London-based Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) to the World Bank get the chance to wipe clean their slate and begin a new framework, maybe with a little carried over optimism from the

Falling flat

Attempting to put together a commentary on the state of the Arab capital markets has become increasingly difficult for fear of being too biased, or worse, too skeptical. But as the parades of often-eloquent speakers continue to elaborate on the development of stock and credit markets in the Arab world, it is safe to say

Happy days?

The stock market’s upward move this year has humbled many analysts and perplexed even the most optimistic financial experts. Take the all-tech/all-emotions Nasdaq as an example: it’s up a mind-boggling 73% from its October 2002 lows, a tempting sign to many that it’s safe to invest again. But are Wall Street’s happy days here to

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