Author Archives: Matt Nash

Into the void

There is a certain fascination in Lebanon with world records, whether it’s enough hummus to choke an army or a 20 square meter plate of kibbeh that would cost $140,000 were it an apartment in Ain el-Mreisseh. By November 25, 2014, Lebanon had already broken its own post Civil War record of time spent without

Race to the bottom

In the absence of governance, Banque du Liban (BDL) is doing all the heavy lifting to keep the economy afloat with tourists staying away, consumers hesitating to spend and the growing population of Syrian refugees putting further strain on a state that could not provide basic services even before they arrived. Assessing the impact of

Filling the gap

When international oil companies refused to fund a new survey of Lebanon’s onshore, private investors stepped in, to the tune of $7.8 million. The survey, being conducted from the air with two specially tweaked planes, will cover 6,000 square kilometers and will offer insights into Lebanon’s onshore oil and gas potential. Data acquisition is currently

Refuse crisis

The Syrian refugee crisis is paradoxically helping Lebanon solve its longstanding trash disposal problem. The refugees are themselves producing more garbage, and since Lebanon has long struggled with the problem of where to put much of its refuse, the European Union was prompted to donate €14 million ($18 million) in 2014 to build more landfills

Quality concerns

There’s something missing from the debate about Lebanon’s water woes, several experts on the topic argue. “Engineers, the government, they care about quantity,” says Samira Korfali, an associate professor of chemistry at the Lebanese American University whose water research focuses on metal content in water. “I care about quality.” Indeed, the government’s response to this

All at sea

This article is part of Executive’s special report on the oil and gas sector. Read more stories as they’re published here, or pick up October’s issue at newsstands in Lebanon.   Protecting the world’s waters from pollution associated with offshore oil and gas exploration and production is not a global priority. While then-Russian President Dimitri

Looking onshore

This article is part of Executive’s special report on the oil and gas sector. Read more stories as they’re published here, or pick up October’s issue at newsstands in Lebanon.   Although Lebanon’s seven onshore exploration wells — drilled between 1947 and 1967 — all turned up dry, that does not mean there are no

A treasure trove

This article is part of Executive’s special report on the oil and gas sector. Read more stories as they’re published here, or pick up October’s issue at newsstands in Lebanon.   Like skinning the proverbial cat, there are many ways a state can earn money from oil and gas resources. A government’s goal in negotiating

Never too early to plan

This article is part of Executive’s special report on the oil and gas sector. Read more stories as they’re published here, or pick up October’s issue at newsstands in Lebanon.   There’s a joke in the oil industry that goes: “The lead drilling engineer for an exploration well walks into his boss’ office and says, ‘Well, I’ve

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