Real Estate articles

Angry faces are painted on port construction material.

No project, but no public

No project, but no public

This article is part of a continuing Executive investigation into public and private lands along Beirut’s western coast. For more stories in this series, click here. When the Ministry of Environment called today for the Municipality of Beirut to deny building permits on Raouche’s coastal Dalieh area, it didn’t faze the owners of the private property.

High price madness

Residential development trends are catchy. Companies in Lebanon very often adopt whatever seems to be working best or whatever is applied most on the residential market. Why reinvent the wheel, indeed? While this maxim may hold true in many instances and certainly simplifies life, the underlying reason behind a particular strategy may be diluted or

In photos: The creative cave

Every human dwelling owes something to the primordial need for shelter that is associated with the stereotype of a caveman — which is usually a synonym for a life with ample room for cultural refinement. But unfortunately, far too many apartments and even so-called villas of our day and age fit the caveman ticket at

Taking their time

Two years ago, in a real estate special report, Executive quoted a source saying that by 2014 there would be an abundance of empty apartments on the market. Today, “there are unsold apartments,” says Massaad Fares, CEO of Prime Consult. Getting more personal, Fares says that “slightly more than half” of his company’s mixed-use Sama

Higher regulation

The legal framework governing real estate in Lebanon is convoluted. While several administrative bodies are tasked with applying the multiple laws and decrees that outline regulations for real estate projects in the country, the sector is guided by no strategic vision. Regulations are either favorable to developers or riddled with loopholes. Frequent changes in the

Namir Cortas, president of the Real Estate Developers Association of Lebanon

Tangled in a web of red tape

Executive sits down with Namir Cortas, a founder of Estates Property Development and Investment, as well as president of the recently-formed Real Estate Developers Association of Lebanon (REDAL), to talk taxes, regulation and corruption.   Why was REDAL created? We created an association that aims at pooling the major developers in an effort to better

Raouche rumor mill

This article is part of a continuing Executive investigation into public and private lands along Beirut’s western coast. For more stories in this series, click here. No one knows what — if anything — is coming.  Rumors about the fate of a peninsula next to Beirut’s iconic Pigeon Rocks abound, but little is known for

Lost in suburbia

Beirut’s eastern suburbs entail a broad social and economic mix, ranging from high-density residential areas dominated by aging apartment buildings, to the country’s most affluent areas in terms of average household incomes. In the coastal zone of suburbia stretching north of the capital, new commercial and residential hubs have formed in the past few years

Part of The Boulevard project

Exporting Solidere

Plastic sheets with slick photos and generic names like “The Candy Shop” covering storefronts make Amman’s The Boulevard look less empty than it is. Some five years after initially planned, the $423 million project officially opened to the public on June 14, but of the 22,000 square meters dedicated to shops, cafes and restaurants, only

Plus properties construction works in Ashrafieh Beirut.

Misleading law on measurements

Lebanon has witnessed an upheaval in recent months over the new law liberating old rental contracts. Inflamed, people took to the streets, some for — some against. While the rental law reopened the public debate over the implications of real estate legislation on social equity, the need for fair and adequate property legislation is hardly

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