Entrepreneurship articles

Is Lebanon’s startup ecosystem sustainable?

Is Lebanon’s startup ecosystem sustainable?

When I was first introduced to Beirut’s start-up ecosystem in 2011, AltCity was refurbishing its first space, the Seeqnce experiment had just launched, MEVP was one of the few venture capital (VC) firms investing in Lebanon, Endeavor was just opening, and Wamda and ArabNet were nascent. Fast-forward to 2016 and Beirut is a different city

United foods of Lebanon

On a typical Saturday morning at Souk El Tayeb’s farmers’ market, Umm Ali, a woman from a village in south Lebanon, sells her now famous saj sandwiches next to Raed, a farmer from north Lebanon who sells fruits and vegetables grown on his land. Meanwhile, at Tawlet in Mar Mikhael, a restaurant that employs female

The legal building blocks of the ecosystem

Lebanon is an awful place to start an innovative, new business venture – from a legal perspective, at least. There are a few general rules that apply to startup companies: 1) Around 90 percent are expected to fail; 2) Founders typically have no cash, investing all they have (and all they can raise) into the

Into a new dimension

A new layer in the entrepreneurship ecosystem is taking shape through the increasing institutional presence of academic bodies, including both top-tier and less prominent universities in Lebanon. Universities have been linked locally to entrepreneurship in the past, but this link was often feeble and limited to teaching a few courses or having an occasional conference.

The rocky road from inventor to businessman

Antoine Sayah is learning how to actually build a business. Two years ago, he was an undergraduate studying architecture and working on an assignment for a design class. Students were tasked with building a product that was “useful in your everyday life,” he recalls. A Jounieh native, Sayah loves the beach. He made a foldable

Going it alone, together

Samar Ibrahim doesn’t like her current office. Since February, necessity has forced her into a small space in the bowels of ABC Mall, Ashrafieh. She suggests meeting for an interview instead at Urbanista on the top floor. It’s fitting that she’s chosen a coffee shop as a setting – she sounds like her own ideal

Locking up the key

Identity protection is a huge and ever growing need in the knowledge economy. Ki, which was initially conceived as a hardware authentication token for password storage by its founders Priscilla Elora Sharuk and Antoine Jebara, is a Lebanese solution for identity protection. Executive caught up with Sharuk to see how the startup has progressed since

Sharp Minds

Antoine Saab and Nadia Moussouni are the entrepreneurs behind Energy24, a power storage solution which they claim is suited to solving the most challenging electricity supply problems. Since being recognized as a Top 20 entrepreneurial company by  Executive in 2014, their company Sharp Minds has added a solar energy component to its electricity storage product.

Economena Analytics

There is a tremendous link between what Lebanon needs in terms of information, transparency and planning, and what improved data can help deliver. In this context, Executive followed up on developments at Beirut-based data services provider, Economena Analytics, with company founder Tamim Akiki and deputy chief executive Amani Kandil. E   What has happened with

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