Hospitality & Tourism articles

Cheers for the beers

Cheers for the beers

Compared to the ancient history of beer in the Middle East, Lebanon’s small craft breweries are extremely new on the scene. The earliest evidence of beer brewing was found in Mesopotamia some 6,000 years ago, while the world’s oldest brewery, which was located in Egypt, dates to around 3400 BC. Beer eventually made it to

In high spirits

Behind that flute of prosecco or gin-based cocktail enjoyed at a bar after a long day—or even the single malt whisky or bottle of wine recommended by a premium specialty liquor boutique—there is an intricate distribution chain. Executive sat down with Lebanon’s major spirit importers and brand owners to discuss the Lebanese drinks of choice

Breaking new grounds

Entrepreneurship is about dreaming, and making those dreams come true. This has been my story for the past 20 years. I started my Dunkin adventure at the age of 20, not thinking for a second that I would still be here 20 years later, still passionate and excited about the brand as if I had

More than one way to cluster

Rabih Saba and Marwan Ayoub are the founders of Venture Group, a development and consulting group known for its hospitality clusters.The group developed Uruguay Street in 2012, followed by The Village Dbayeh and The Backyard Hazmieh. Saba and Ayoub sat down with Executive to discuss their new venture, Restos St. Nicholas, as well as their

Diversifying Lebanon’s tourism

Executive spoke with Pierre Achkar, president of the Lebanese Federation for Tourism Industries and the Lebanese Hotel Association, who says the tourism industry has learned the hard way the dangers of relying on one market. Although no single market can replace the Gulf tourists, he says, the tourism sector is developing alternative markets and new

A mature market

Lebanon’s food and beverage (F&B) industry is finally getting the kudos it deserves: Beirut was named Travel and Leisure Magazine’s Best International City for Food in 2017, and the country has recently been recommended in many global publications for its food, wine, and nightlife. The country is developing into an F&B haven, as more establishments

The comeback year

After five long years, it seems the dark stormy clouds of dwindling tourist figures and empty rooms have finally cleared from the sky of Lebanese tourism. 2017 was reported by those in the industry to be smooth sailing, for the most part. There may still be some ominous weather ahead—the fallout from Prime Minister Saad

Hugged more tightly

Their corporate identity and logo look like a crossbreed of Dutch over-the-counter laxatives and a new French social media venture. The green color theme of its livery, interior seating, and uniforms is located somewhere between forest serenity and conservative living room furniture. They are Transavia. Their strategy and business model is that of a budget

Destination: Shouf

The verdant Shouf, famous for its unspoiled green vistas, is rapidly evolving into a popular tourist hotspot for Lebanese from across the country, as well as vacationing expatriates, Arab tourists, and even foreign visitors. The area is located southeast of Beirut and comprises many tourist must-sees, from the historic towns of Beiteddine and Deir Al

Bhamdoun’s tourism wasteland

It is a depressing sight: closed shops, empty restaurants, and abandoned hotels. Bhamdoun’s main street, once the glittering gem of Lebanon’s golden age, betrays nothing of its polished upscale past. Today, the mountain town’s disheveled appearance, with its dug up main road and abandoned buildings, seems to be conspiring to keep the tourists away. Local

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