Special Report articles

Anatomy of an insurance sector

Anatomy of an insurance sector

The Lebanese insurance industry is enigmatic in the sense that numerous companies – 50 – share $1.5 billion in gross premiums but that not one of the companies is listed. For a considerable time – at least in the era of the current insurance law which was updated almost 20 years ago – the country’s

Farming for the future

Entrepreneurship in Lebanon is typically associated with technology – generally app development or a high tech startup – but is rarely associated with farming and agriculture. Yet, within the agriculture sector, there is a rising number of business people who deserve to be labelled as entrepreneurs. They are introducing new and unusual food products to

Growing an organic Lebanon

Rooted in a 2007 project to grow organic fruits and vegetables at the Massoud family farm in Batroun, North Lebanon, for their own consumption and distribution to relatives and friends, Biomass has since become one of Lebanon’s biggest producers and distributors of organic products. Soon after establishing the company, the Massouds found that their farm

Lebanon: land of plenty?

Based on our geography textbooks, Lebanese school students grow up learning that Lebanon has a strong agriculture sector with practically each region excelling at growing a certain type of fresh produce – from the citrus fruits in Sidon and Tyre to the olives in Koura, North Lebanon and South Lebanon to the many crops in

Extra! Extra!

After 200 months of continuous publication, we at the Executive editorial team could fill a whole book with the stories behind our stories and with lists of our own favorite issues, articles, covers, photos and illustrations. More important than what we think, however, is what our readers think. You, after all, are the reason we

A letter to Gracy

Dear Gracy, Over the past few years, Executive has dedicated considerable editorial efforts to identifying entrepreneurs running young businesses that deserve attention. In particular, we have strived to highlight the exceptional but often under-appreciated work of Lebanese business women. Finding and acknowledging these people has been one of the most rewarding tasks for us as

Snapshots of a world in turmoil

From the mountains of Afghanistan to the battlefields of Syria and the refugee camps of Lebanon, Executive’s photojournalists have covered some of the most pressing stories of our time through their camera lenses. As part of our special 200 issues feature, Executive provides our readers with a selection of the most powerful images our photojournalists have captured over the years.

The regional touch

The story of Executive’s first 200 issues would be incomplete without the regional angle. While the magazine was conceived with a clear focus on the economic development of its home country, the fortunes of the Lebanese are entwined with many host countries. The notion of expanding into a regional business publication was compelled by relational,

A two-way street

In the age of digital media Executive continues to circulate a print magazine to subscribers and newsstands every month. The reason why is straightforward: our readers still demand a physical copy of the magazine in supplement to our online content. And it is they who motivate us to deliver the best, most impactful, quality journalism.

The business team: a question of balance

According to centuries-old journalistic orthodoxy, writers and editors live on one side of an impenetrable barrier while advertising sales and marketing staff live on the other. Hungarian-American media figure Joseph Pulitzer – the namesake of the world’s best-known prize for journalism – is credited with saying that commercial success is good for a newspaper’s “moral

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