Banking & Finance articles

Executive Magazine’s June issue

Executive Magazine’s June issue

Reading Time: < 1 minute As the Lebanese crisis of insufficient politics, imperiled economy, impaired liquidity, and quarrelsome financial behaviors is limping toward its next pain point, the topics of banking and financial restructuring are taking center stage. The judicial and organizational implications for the banking industry are vital for the future of Lebanon’s economy. As always in our June

Questions on data, policy design, and usefulness of assumptions

Reading Time: 11 minutes Economic man is a curious construct. Once thought to be a being superior to the common human in his pursuit of value creation and profit generation, the image of this specialized imaginary human subspecies has fundamentally changed. In fact, economic man has reached a point where some contemporary economists describe this model as emotionally dysfunctional—proposing

Banking economists on the Lebanese banking sector

Reading Time: 14 minutes Bankers are people. Brothers, sisters, mothers, fathers, spouses, children, cousins, clients, business advisors, financial partners, and friends of other Lebanese people. Given that over 25,000 individuals are employed in the local banking sector, with high percentages of them being women (in comparison to most not “traditionally female” professions) in a banking workforce that is composed

The Lebanese banking sector, a long view

Reading Time: 10 minutes Lebanon’s geographic location and trading history dictate the need for three basic premises in terms of its Economic Policy: a strong and stable currency, advantageous trading facilities and low taxes. Michel Chiha Once there was a time when a Lebanese banker had a national vision. Whether a contemporary citizen agrees with this vision or not

The Lebanese people have the right to know and the capacity to contribute to their economic rescue

Reading Time: 7 minutes Three men in suits, with the carefully groomed looks of advanced-middle-age males, stand on Beirut’s landmark cliff and contemplate the mysteries of the sea that looms some 150 feet below them. One is a reputed banking economist, one a famous government technocrat, and one, with a much cheaper suit, the driver/bodyguard that brought them to

Q&A with Riad Obegi, chairman of Banque BEMO, on banking sector challenges

Reading Time: 7 minutes At a time when banking is materially challenged by economic and financial stresses, and is faced with extreme criticism from distressed depositors and the explosion of economic commentators and activists of all colors in the country, Executive wanted to know what local banking leaders have to say about the quagmire and the way forward. Riad

Q&A with Ziad Hayek on his and Gérard Charvet’s plan to overcome Lebanon’s financial crisis

Reading Time: 8 minutes The arrival of a team by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in Beirut for negotiations on the national need for financial assistance under a rescue package has sparked a wave of discussions on the task. This interest is fueled by widespread concerns that the latest official draft plan—based on a paper by international financial firm

Q&A with actuary Ibrahim Muhanna on insurance liabilities amid economic crisis

Reading Time: 6 minutes Practically every private household in Lebanon relies on one or other insurance service, beginning with the mandatory protection of motorists under third-party liability insurance or savings schemes offered by life insurers. Services such as health and pension insurance are becoming focuses of attention as the country’s healthcare and employment systems are increasingly challenged. Commercial lines

Confused outlook on insurance coverage for Lebanese COVID-19 patients

Reading Time: 5 minutes In the immediacy of the coronavirus crisis, the most pertinent insurance question for the holder of a medical policy is simple: Who will pay if I need to be hospitalized?  The answer, as with many things in Lebanon, depends. According to Nadine Habbal, acting head of Lebanon’s Insurance Control Commission, slightly more than half of

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